The Boy (2016)

USA| January 2016| 97 min| English
The Boy (2016)
Genre Horror, Thriller
Color Color
Certification USA:PG-13 , Netherlands:16 , Singapore:PG13
Other Titles The Inhabitant
Locations British Columbia, Canada
Director William Brent Bell
Lead Cast Lauren Cohan, Rupert Evans
Trailer
Watch Trailer of THE BOY (2016)
Tagline
Every child needs to be loved.
Plot Summary
Greta (Lauren Cohan) is a young woman from Montana who escapes an abusive relationship with ex-boyfriend Cole (Ben Robson) by getting a temporary job as a nanny for the Heelshire family in a remote English village. Upon reaching there, Greta realises that her job entails taking care of a porcelain doll, which is treated as a real boy by the elderly couple Mr & Mrs Heelshire (Jim Norton, Diana Hardcastle) as a way to cope with the demise of their only son 20 years ago. The doll is named Brahms after the couple's real son. Once Greta gets settled, the Heelshires plan to leave on holiday, and before doing so they give Greta a list of strict rules to follow, warning that Brahms is not a normal child. A reluctant Greta, does not take the old couple's warning seriously, and chose to ignore some of the rules, like regularly making calls to her sister and befriending the Heelshire's flirtatious grocery boy. Soon after strange and surreal activities begin to happen, but matters worsen after Greta gets locked in the attic by an unseen force leading her to believe that the spirit of Heelshire's son lives in the doll.
Trivia
This is director William Brent Bell's second supernatural flick after The Devil Inside (2012).

The film is actress Lauren Cohan's first in the horror genre.
Lauren Cohan Greta Evans
Rupert Evans Malcolm
Jim Norton Mr Heelshire
Diana Hardcastle Mrs Heelshire
Ben Robson Cole
James Russell James
Jett Klyne young Brahms
Lily Pater Emily Cribbs
Matthew Walker Taxi Driver
Stephanie Lemelin Sandy
Director William Brent Bell
Producer Matt Berenson
Roy Lee
Gary Lucchesi
Tom Rosenberg
Jim Wedaa
Executive Producer David Kern
John Powers Middleton
Adam Stone
Writer Stacey Menear(story)
Stacey Menear(screenplay)
Lyricist
Music Composer Bear McCreary
Singers
Choreographers
Cinematographer Daniel Pearl
Action Director Dan Shea
Film Editor Brian Berdan
Casting Director Julie Hutchinson
Production Designer John Willett
Art Director James Steuart
Costume Designer Jori Woodman
Production Companies Huayi Brothers Media
Lakeshore Entertainment
STX Entertainment
Vertigo Entertainment
Distributor STX Entertainment
Not available
Not available
Reviews on external websites
All ratings are based on 5. NA indicates rating not available.

FlickeringMyth.com|Review by Robert Kojder
The most accurate comparison of The Boy is a really bad ripoff of other films that just comes across as a bad episode of Scooby-Doo.
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1
RogerEbert.com|Review by Christy Lemire
In the pantheon of creepy dolls – from Talky Tina in “The Twilight Zone” to Chucky in the “Child’s Play” movies to Annabelle in “The Conjuring” – it’s often the idea of the inanimate object coming to life and wreaking bloody havoc that’s more frightening than the actual execution.
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1.5
Hollywood Reporter|Review by Frank Scheck
It's a wonder that dolls are manufactured anymore, considering how many of them turn out to be haunted or demonically possessed, at least in the movies. Now joining the cinematic ranks of the likes of Chuckie and Annabelle is Brahms, the life-sized porcelain doll who figures prominently in the alternately creepy and silly horror film The Boy.
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NA
AVClub.com|Review by Katie Rife
The Boy isn’t a terrible movie. It has its moments of tension and (intentional) comic relief, and lead actress Lauren Cohan, best known for her role as Maggie on The Walking Dead, brings a subtle-yet-palpable spark of insanity to an interesting turn her character takes midway through the second act.
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2.5
New York Times|Review by Neil Genzlinger
A creepy doll and a creepy house are the main ingredients of “The Boy,” a small-cast horror movie that spends a lot of time building itself into a psychological thriller, only to veer in a more literal direction at the end.
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NA
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